Agile Compass

Between February 11th and 13th of 2001, the Agile Software Development Manifesto emerged. From the begining, it defied corporate bureaucrats happy to push processes for the sake of processes instead of trying to do the best for the customer. A timely, tangible, and as promised delivery for the customer became one of the focus of the Agile movement. Moreover, the Agile movement recognized that in the new economy, to move aggressively into the era of e-business, e-commerce, and the web, businesses had to rid themselves of documentation driven, heavyweight software development processes.

The values for “The Agile Alliance” were and are until today (Agile Manifesto, 2001):

  1. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  2. Working software over comprehensive documentation
  3. Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  4. Responding to change over following a plan

These values are supported by twelve principles that can be grouped given their subject in three different areas: project approach, change approach and team approach (Image Nº1. Grouping of the Principles).

Image Nº1. Grouping of the 12 Agile Principles

No hay texto alternativo para esta imagen

Source: Nastasha Velasco based on the Agile Manifesto, 2019.

Grouping the principles allow us to find the commonalities within them and the key elements that could be associated with a basic Agile approach.

In terms of project management, we can evidence three key elements. Early, frequent and continuous delivery of the software, product or service; attention to technical excellence & design, and an easy metric of success: working software/product/service. When it comes to the change approach, given its customer centricity, changes by the customer are welcomed at any stage. Even late in the development. Finally, the team approach evidences six key elements. It’s important for the implementation of an Agile approach that within our organizations we mix the business-oriented people with the responsibles of the software, product or service. Allowing them to work together will improve the workflow and deliveries while preventing failures or errors caused by silos. Moreover, Agile teams require motivated people. Those that you can trust, easily guide, and that only will need you to provide them a supporting environment. Finally, Agile teams are self-organizing, have constant face-to-face communication and make spaces for retrospective and integration of learnings (Image Nº2. Key Elements within the Principles per Group Area).

Image Nº2. Key Elements within the Principles per Group Area

No hay texto alternativo para esta imagen

Source: Nastasha Velasco based on the Agile Manifesto, 2019.

Hence, next time that you wonder if your startup or organization is having an Agile approach explore how are you doing in terms of the key elements we identified per area ( Image Nº3. Key Questions per Area for Evaluating your Agile Approach ). They might allow you to find areas of improvement!

Image Nº3. Key Questions per Area for Evaluating your Agile ApproachNo hay texto alternativo para esta imagen

Source: Nastasha Velasco based on the Agile Manifesto, 2019.

Good luck with your Agile journey!

Nastasha Velasco

Leave a Reply

Scroll to Top
%d bloggers like this: